Hillary will be (just) a safer bet for India
Hillary will be (just) a safer bet for India

Hillary will be (just) a safer bet for India

So Donald Trump “is a big fan of India and a big fan of Hindu (sic)”; is he At a gathering of about 5,000 American Indians at New Jersey's Raritan Center, addressing what was probably the first country-specific ethno-religious rally by a US presidential hopeful, the Republican candidate promised a “phenomenal future” for Indo-US ties and said that under a “Trump administration”, the two countries “are going to be best friends”. This is the first time that Trump has spoken about his vision for the country′s relationship with India and has tried to tick all the right boxes. But American Indians remain wary of him, given his earlier protectionist rants, which, if taken to their logical conclusion under a “Trump administration”, would dry up the access of Indian IT companies and professionals to the US market. One can't help feeling that his newfound love for India is a desperate attempt by an inveterate gambler to put some ballast back in his floundering campaign. Does this mean I think Hillary Clinton is a better bet for India As you will read in the Cover Story, this publication has some reservations on that count too. But for now, I think I will go along with the conventional wisdom among Indian expatriates in the US that she is likely to be a safer bet than her maverick rival - till I come across more concrete evidence of Trump's vision. Indian IT's painful transition Elsewhere in this magazine, we have dived deep into the Indian IT sector as it embarks upon a painful transition up the value chain that will undoubtedly see it trip and fall many times before it can ride high again. R. Chandrasekhar, the President of India's premier IT trade association, NASSCOM, offers his exclusive insights into the industry's current churn and what lies ahead globally. Modi's CLMV reach-out I'm happy to report that India under Prime Minister Narendra Modi is trying to revive the strategic-economic legacy of the British Raj that earlier Indian governments had frittered away. New Delhi is reaching out to the CLMV (Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Vietnam) sub-group within ASEAN not only to counter the influence of China but also to try and get a toe-hold into the Trans-Pacific Partnership, of which some of these countries are a part. Theresa May cannot afford 'pedestrian' India visit In Europe, the main debate remains Brexit, and the confusion that the UK's decision to leave the European Union (EU) has created. Prime Minister Theresa May will, however, have an opportunity to set out a new vision for UK-India relations when she visits India in early November on her first visit as PM. May cannot afford a pedestrian visit, and must come back with a strong set of deliverables. Mutters in India that the UK craves Indian business but will do everything to keep Indian talent out is an impression that May will have to dispel. India, on the other hand, will I am sure give the UK a patient hearing, but the mood in Delhi is pretty much one of "wait and watch". Flanders: First movers The UK's European cousins are eager not to be left behind and some are already pressing the fast-forward button to seek out opportunities. The region of Flanders in Belgium, and home of the capital Brussels, is seeking a first-mover advantage for Indian investment. In our Hot Spot segment, we showcase how Flanders seeks to pip the UK as India's most favoured FDI destination in Europe. India's Man in Kabul Closer to India's borders, our team caught up with the enigmatic Manpreet Vohra, India's man in Kabul. In the Diplomat Corner section this time, Ambassador Vohra talks us through the opportunities and achievements of the Modi administration in this unsettled but hugely important region for India's global outreach. I take this opportunity to wish every reader a very Happy Diwali.

Manoj Ladwa is the founder of India Inc. and chief executive of MLS Chase Group @manojladwa

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